History of Alpacas

Alpacas are a domesticated member of the camel (camelid) family.  The camelid family also includes llamas, guanacos, and vicunas from South America, and the Bactrian and Dromedary camels from Asia and Africa.  This family of animals originated on the plains of North America about 10 million years ago.  A common ancestor to the South American camelids migrated to South America about 2.5 million years ago.  Two wild species, vicunas and guanacos, emerged.  They still live in the Andes.  It is believed that about 6,000 years ago alpacas were created through selective breeding which was heavily influenced by the vicuna.  There are similarities in size, fiber, and dentition (teeth) between the alpaca and the wild vicuna.

Today there are about 3.5 million alpacas in the Andean highlands, most of which can be found in Peru.  Since the major first importation into the U.S. in 1984, the North American herd has increased from a few alpacas in zoos and private collections to about 20,000.  Alpacas are popular internationally for their luxury fiber and as pet, show, and investment animals in Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, Poland, France, and Israel, as well as the United States.

History of the scientific name

The relationship between alpacas and vicuñas was disputed for many years. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the four South American lamoid species were assigned scientific names. At that time, the alpaca was assumed to be descended from the llama, ignoring similarities in size, fleece and dentition between the alpaca and the vicuña. Classification was complicated by the fact that all four species of South American camelid can interbreed and produce fertile offspring. The advent of DNA technology made a more accurate classification possible.

In 2001, the alpaca genus classification changed from Lama pacos to Vicugna pacos, following the presentation of a paper on work by Dr. Jane Wheeler et al. on alpaca DNA to the Royal Society showing the alpaca is descended from the vicuña, not the guanaco.


 


 


 


 

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